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Mike Rochip

Intel Releasing Quad Core Processors

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SAN FRANCISCO - Intel Corp. plans to begin shipping microprocessors that have four computing engines on a single chip — products that analysts say will help it win back market share from rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc.

 

The first chip, the Intel Core 2 Extreme quad-core processor, will be available in November. Intel says it will deliver a 70 percent performance improvement over Intel's current chips, which have one or two computing cores. The new chip is aimed at gamers, programmers and other people with heavy-duty computing needs.

 

For general consumers, Intel will ship a quad-core chip starting in the first quarter of 2007. For businesses, Intel will begin shipping four-core server chips later this year. A low-energy, quad chip for servers will be launched early next year, the company said Tuesday.

 

Offering high performance while maintaining energy efficiency is the name of the game in chip industry, CEO Paul Otellini said at the Intel Developer Forum.

 

"The industry is going through the most profound shift in decades, moving to an era where performance and energy efficiency are critical in all market segments and all aspects of computing," he said. "The solution begins with the transistor and extends to the chip and platform levels."

 

Otellini said the Santa Clara-based company's chips would deliver a 300 percent improvement in performance per watt over the next four years.

 

The new products give Intel — the world's largest chip maker — the opportunity to reverse sinking profits and regain market share stolen by AMD. Earlier this month, Intel announced it would cut 10 percent of its staff, or 10,500 jobs positions, to save $3 billion per year by 2008.

 

Analysts have criticized Intel for reacting too slowly after AMD's 2003 launch of the Opteron and Athlon 64 chips for servers and desktop PCs.

 

AMD will introduce a particularly efficient and fast quad-core chip for high-performance servers in mid-2007, said spokesman John Taylor.

 

"Our strategy is consistent — it's a customer-focused strategy that makes the transition as easy and benefit-rich for the customer as possible," Taylor said.

 

But it's unclear whether AMD's offering will make up for Intel's early lead, said IDC analyst Bob O'Donnell.

 

"Intel moved up this announcement specifically as an offensive blow against AMD, and it gives Intel a good six- to nine-month lead," O'Donnell said. "They're both taking this battle seriously. There's no question AMD will react — it's just a matter of when."

 

Shares of Intel gained 55 cents — nearly 3 percent — to close at $19.96 in Tuesday trading on the Nasdaq Stock Market. Shares of AMD lost 78 cents — nearly 3 percent — to close at $25.99 on the Nasdaq.

 

[This article is from the AP and posted on Yahoo News which apparently can't be linked to for some reason I guess only Yahoo knows :angry: ]

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It is basically 2x Core 2 Duos on one chip.

In some scenarios it perform same as a Conroe, in other scenarios, it can perform about twice as good.

 

Due to it being in the Core 2 Extreme series, it will probably cost too.

The TDP value of the Kentsfield (Core 2 Quadro), is pretty high.

 

 

Atm, AMD has nothing, but later this year, they will move down to 65nm too, which means that production will be cheaper for them than it was before. AMD is also coming with their K8L architecture, and a true quadcore processor (not two dualcores on one chip). But its still 6-9 months until it. :(

Don't know the performance or TDP value of it though.

 

Intel's Core Duo architecture is very good...

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I had no idea what TPD was so I had to look it up and thought I would share in case anyone else needed to know.

 

The Thermal Power Dissipations are usually for an entire specific line, and they are the Maximum Watts that a Processor that falls in that category can dissipate under Full Load condition. The 130 nm Athlons 64, for example, have a maximum Thermal Power Dissipation of 89 Watts, however, no Processor actually reach that amount. That is a security measure so Cooler manufacturers make they products to support at least 89 Watts of dissipation that makes that the Athlons 64 run in a safe temperature range.

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Quad Core sounds very interesting. Ive been researching stuff (as im not very computer savy) to build a new computer for about a year now, and have decided to wait till the quad core come out (the true ones) before building it. Also (and dont shoot me here!) im waiting for windows Vistas as well, so i can purchase a copy and install it fresh on a fresh computer.

 

When i get close to getting one, i will post and ask all of your suggestions as to what you think are good and compatible hardware choices. I think it was loikee (where is that dude) that built a nice rig recently, and i was hoping to do something fun like he did. anyhoo, thanks for the info here guys!

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The lower the TDP is, the better. The less power it use, and a CPU with lower TDP also often runs cooler and don't need as much cooling which allows for more silent cooling.

 

Quadcore is interesting. But it doesn't give you 4x the performance all the time as you expected. In many normal applications it doesn't provide any extra performance. In multi-threaded applications which are built to utilize many cores, it provides much better performance though. BeOS was an operating system that was heavily multi-threaded.

 

Vista. :wacko:

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Quad Core sounds very interesting. When i get close to getting one, i will post and ask all of your suggestions as to what you think are good and compatible hardware choices. I think it was loikee (where is that dude) that built a nice rig recently, and i was hoping to do something fun like he did. anyhoo, thanks for the info here guys!

:P

 

I'm still alive, just not on the web as much as I used to be. My rig has a dual-core proc, which is really neat for when I'm ripping music and watching a movie, or extracting a large compressed file and playing a video game (I ran my computer through a few torture tests just to see what it could do). In my opinion, multiple processing cores are definitely a major innovation, and I personally will be keeping my eyes peeled for mobos that support quad-cores (its sad, but I'm already drooling over updates I could make to my new computer; guess I'm hard to please :D ).

 

A little off topic, but I'm hoping that GPU manufacturers (namely ATI and NVIDIA) will start working on multi-core GPUs, as opposed to simply have multiple video cards. I never liked the idea of SLI / CrossFire, because the cards take up so much space, suck up so much power, and give off so much heat (to say nothing of cost). Having one video card with several GPU cores on it seems like a much smarter graphics solution; oh well, I can dream...

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:P

 

I'm still alive, just not on the web as much as I used to be. My rig has a dual-core proc, which is really neat for when I'm ripping music and watching a movie, or extracting a large compressed file and playing a video game (I ran my computer through a few torture tests just to see what it could do). In my opinion, multiple processing cores are definitely a major innovation, and I personally will be keeping my eyes peeled for mobos that support quad-cores (its sad, but I'm already drooling over updates I could make to my new computer; guess I'm hard to please :D ).

 

A little off topic, but I'm hoping that GPU manufacturers (namely ATI and NVIDIA) will start working on multi-core GPUs, as opposed to simply have multiple video cards. I never liked the idea of SLI / CrossFire, because the cards take up so much space, suck up so much power, and give off so much heat (to say nothing of cost). Having one video card with several GPU cores on it seems like a much smarter graphics solution; oh well, I can dream...

 

It is natural for geeks to drool over new hardware. :D

 

I agree with you. 3dfx had in around year 2000 their Voodoo5 series with VSA-100 chips, and it 2 chips. And the prototype of the Voodoo5 6000 had 4 chips.

I would never ever run SLI / CrossFire. Too much cost, heat, power consumption, noise, etc. I would preferably get a graphics card without active cooling (fan). Less noise and just one less thing that can break and go wrong.

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A little off topic, but I'm hoping that GPU manufacturers (namely ATI and NVIDIA) will start working on multi-core GPUs, as opposed to simply have multiple video cards. I never liked the idea of SLI / CrossFire, because the cards take up so much space, suck up so much power, and give off so much heat (to say nothing of cost). Having one video card with several GPU cores on it seems like a much smarter graphics solution; oh well, I can dream...

 

 

Isn't the NVIDIA 7950 GX2 sort of like that...I mean it's like SLI on a single card. It's close, not exact, but still it's something.

 

I'm planning on building a Core 2 Duo system using the E6600, cause of it's overclockablity.

 

Wikipedia - Intel Core 2 Informatino Geez--how do people have this much info already? Insiders?

 

AJ

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Isn't the NVIDIA 7950 GX2 sort of like that...I mean it's like SLI on a single card. It's close, not exact, but still it's something.

 

I'm planning on building a Core 2 Duo system using the E6600, cause of it's overclockablity.

 

Wikipedia - Intel Core 2 Informatino Geez--how do people have this much info already? Insiders?

 

AJ

 

That is not much information. And it is contributed by many people. Alot of who are geeks. :D

There are software like CPUID or CPU-Z and stuff that tells you alot about your system and CPU such as L1, L2 cache size, architecture, revision, FSB, frequency, family, stepping, etc, etc.

 

 

C2D and C2E have been out for at least a month already :lol:

 

AMD is actually working on a chip where there are multiple cores combined to function as one super-fast core.

 

I heard something about multiple cores working as one fast core, it was a rumour about something called "anti-hypterthreading" but it was just a rumour. Don't know which CPU it was for, but I assume Intel.

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Isn't the NVIDIA 7950 GX2 sort of like that...I mean it's like SLI on a single card. It's close, not exact, but still it's something.

Not really. The 7950 is basically just two video cards sandwiched together, one on top of the other. I personally can't even stand the thought of it. To me, it seems like the sloppiest way NVIDIA could have chosen to deliver more performance. In my opinion, that is the equivalent to taking two motherboards loaded down with RAM and a processors, and layer them one on top of the other. Sure you could get more power, but it would be a poor, sloppy design that would produce tons of heat, gobble gobs of power, and take up all of your case's space.

 

I would rather that just the GPU itself (not the entire graphics card) contain multiple cores. That way, you would have a card that takes up no more space than previous-gen cards, but yet manages to pump out tons more processing power, and tackle multiple tasks at once. Sure, with only one card, you wouldn't have as much graphics RAM, but with GDDR4 out now, cooler, faster, denser RAM is sure to follow. And with one multicore processor, you wouldn't need a mammoth PSU to power it, it would run much cooler than several single-core processors (only one fan would be necessary, which means less noise too), and it would be cheaper for the manufacturers and the consumers.

 

EDIT: @ Eldmannen: I've heard about multiple cores working as one too, but I've heard about it for both AMD and Intel. I heard it by a different name though... I wish I could remember what it was...

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