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Deprecated cookie

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Hi of late ccleaner has been telling me it cleaned a deprecated cookie in folder appData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\INetCookies\deprecated.cookie

I always rerun ccleaner until it reports back that it has cleaned 'nothing'. But this deprecated cookie is always recleaned and never disappears. Can anyone tell me what it is? And when I try to access the folder myself and none of my folders are hidden, 'inetcokies' does not exist?

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In computer lingo, deprecated generally refers to something that is tolerated, available or allowed -- but not usually recommended -- usually a feature that is no longer supported.  I have the exact same thing on my windows 10 computer and it started right after I updated to the Fall Creators Update.  I have discovered this cookie is related to Internet Explorer.  Although I haven't used IE in years, a lot of Windows behind-the-scene stuff does.  You can get rid of the deprecated cookie (but only for a day or so as it then comes back) if you go to start>control panel>network and internet>internet options and then delete Internet Explorer browser history, making sure the cookies selection is checked.  Then run CCleaner and it'll be gone, but, as I said earlier, it will return in a day or so.

 

I have no idea what this deprecated cookie is directly related to.  Perhaps this will be remedied in a future version of CCleaner.

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Thank you Crizal, I occasionally use Internet explorer, and have it set to clear everything when I close it. What I currently find strange, is that when I haven’t used IE, ccleaner still finds files to clean from IE history, cookies etc each time I clean.


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What I currently find strange, is that when I haven’t used IE, ccleaner still finds files to clean from IE history, cookies etc each time I clean.

 

 

That's because it's integrated into the system and other programs can and will use it without your knowledge. Some basic examples

* Some antivirus software requires it to download updates. Subsequently block IE with a firewall software and such antivirus may fail to update.

* Open a folder on your system and things get put into the History area.

* Look at the help section in a program and it may need to load some javascript, and/or it may fetch images, etc., from the program website.

 

The list goes on!

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5 hours ago, TheAncient said:

F.Y.I.: This cookie contains the text:
"Cookies are no longer stored in files.  Please use Internet*Cookie* APIs to access cookies."

ummm,... and...??? :huh:

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It might be interesting to note that the cookie does not exist until CCleaner runs to delete it.  Go to the INetCookies directory (see above) and it will not be there, then click the "Run Cleaner" button in CCleaner and you will see the cookie appear, then get deleted.  CCleaner seems to be creating it so that it can delete it!  If you double click on the cookie just after it gets created, but before CCleaner can get it deleted you will see the content as described in some postings above.

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What about SemperVasporo's post, Piriform? Is CCleaner creating depreciated cookies simply to look good? 

On 3/2/2018 at 21:10, SemperVaporo said:

It might be interesting to note that the [depreciated] cookie does not exist until CCleaner runs to delete it.  Go to the INetCookies directory (see above) and it will not be there, then click the "Run Cleaner" button in CCleaner and you will see the cookie appear, then get deleted.  CCleaner seems to be creating it so that it can delete it!  If you double click on the cookie just after it gets created, but before CCleaner can get it deleted you will see the content as described in some postings above.

 

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But why would it be coded to "look good" because where cookies live on a system is so hidden away where normal everyday users would never bother digging into to get an impression of a software "looking good", it either works or doesn't work.

Cleaning of IE is different from in the past since Microsoft changed things - made evident by CCleaner taking a long time to clean both IE and Edge, or displaying that it can't clean them at a particular time.

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Latest version of CCleaner ("5.41.6446 (64-bit)") initially seemed to not create the deprecated cookie, but now I have noticed that it still does, sometimes.  I have not been able to determine what causes it to be created and what causes it to be not created to be deleted.  This morning I have run CCleaner 3 times and it created it each time, but it did not create it at all yesterday, no matter how many times I ran CCleaner.

I also noted that even though I have the cookie file open in NotePad, CCleaner is able to delete it.  Usually when a file is open in another program, it is locked and cannot be deleted by another program.

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I have a question I read this but didn't have time to read it in full and when I ask someone they look at me like, "what the he11 you talking about"

Here is the question, when you use CCleaner or SuperantiSpyware or programs like them they leave folders or something behind that in time make your computer slow down. They say you need to delete these files or folders but need to do it manually. 

Anyone know what they were talking about? 

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On 16/10/2019 at 03:50, JohnnyT said:

They say you need to delete these files or folders but need to do it manually. 

Anyone know what they were talking about? 

If I understand, you mean how do you delete manually?  It just mean going into the folder (using windows explorer), highlighting the leftover(s) and pressing delete (or choosing delete from the right click menu).

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Leftover folders will not slow your computer down if they are empty.

They may take some badly written  'scanning' programs a little bit longer.

Most programmes will see it's an empty folder and just move on.

If there is something in that folder then you may have to delete it yourself as nergal says above.

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The only time a folder from my experience can slow down your computer is if there are too many files in that one particular folder, the scenarios I've seen on both HDD and SSD going back from WinXP up to Win10:
* Putting thousands of music files say MP3 in one folder take forever to load when Windows is reading the metadata (ID3 tags).
* Having too many downloaded files left inside the Downloads folder (which should've been moved, or deleted ages ago) and when opening the folder triggers the antivirus real-time protection to start scanning everything in the folder which can cause a significant delay - made even more frustrating if it's on an already slow HDD.

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