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OS in SSD safe to zero-fill?

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I have my OS files in my SSD and currently the SSD is running slow.

 

Therefore, I am considering a zero-fill but I am afraid it will mess up my OS and/or delete my OS and files.

 

Please advice, thank you in advance

 

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What do you think a zero fill will do? Is there any significance from posting in the Defraggler section?

 

Assuming the SSD is not ancient and has TRIM enabled, and the O/S likewise, and the SSD is not absolutely full, the best (and only) thing to do is to run a defraggler/defragger Optimise. This will ensure that any stray deleted pages are cleaned up, but it won't make the SSD run any faster.

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the first release Samsung EVO's had a firmware issue where they would slow down over time.

 

what is your make/model?

age of SSD?

OS?

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go into Control Panel, System, Device Manager and expand the Disk Drive entry.

tell us what entries are underneath - this will identify the manufacturer.

 

what about the points raised by @Augeas - what is the SSD's capacity and how much of that has been used?

have you done an Optimise on it yet?

 

also go into Task Manager (Ctrl+Alt+Del), what are the %'s for CPU, Memory and Disk?

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sorry - I thought a consensus was reached that doing a zero fill to your SSD is 1) bad for the SSD and 2) will not improve performance.

your lack of speed lies elsewhere.

 

so to get off topic this once, and perhaps with a view of moving this to a more pertinent thread, what have you tried maintenance wise?

do you think it's the SSD that is slow, and not the PC in general?

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so your OS is on the SSD (what is your OS?) and it starts in what, less than 20secs?

but you have your software on the HDD do you?

 

and what about that maintenance question???

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As TRIM came out with Win 7 in 2009, and SSDs before that, your audience might be limited. Zero filling a non-TRIM SSD might improve write performance but not for the reasons above (and also falsely claimed in the OCZ forums some years ago).

An empty SSD block contains ones not zeroes, and no software on earth can erase NAND flash blocks. What zero filling does is to allocate a dummy page of zeroes to the LBAs instead of a physical page. The freed pages are subject to garbage collection, which erases them. Thus a pool of erased blocks is available for wrtes, and performance increases.

Zero filling a TRIM SSD is a waste of time, effort and the life of the SSD.

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Old thread, but what I got out of it was the SSD was too small and getting too filled up.

That's why when looking at computers that come with a 120GB or 128GB SSD for the boot drive in my opinion in this day and age for an SSD compatible version of Windows that's way too small of a size and 256GB should be the smallest used boot drive. Couple that with having a secondary larger capacity 500 GB or 1TB or bigger drive either HDD, Hybrid HDD, or SSD rather that be internal or external USB storage that will store things such as downloads, games, music, movies, etc.

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To make @Augeas and @Andavari not look crazy, the post they are replying to was removed when I banned the spammer

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Since it's an old topic I'll close it then. Thanks for making the both of us look sane Nergal!:lol:

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