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raycer

PC slower not faster after CCleaner

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Sounds to me like the PC needs:

1. Rebooted, as this usually solves so many issues when a PC isn't running well.

2. Defragmented.

 

CCleaner really shouldn't have "slowed down a PC," because it removes left-over files, and redundant registry data which shouldn't ever cause performance issues, and if followed by a good defrag after using CCleaner a PC should actually run more efficiently.

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Thanks for your replies

 

Latest CCleaner download - Win XP Prof 32 bit

Both cleaner and registry. Every thing that was checked as default

Did not check prefetch or anything in advanced or anything that was not checked in default

Rebooted and defragmented

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Thanks for your replies

 

Latest CCleaner download - Win XP Prof 32 bit

Both cleaner and registry. Every thing that was checked as default

Did not check prefetch or anything in advanced or anything that was not checked in default

Rebooted and defragmented

 

Not sure if it's better now as you defragmented. Is this about your boottime by the way? If so, are we talking seconds, minutes?

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Running Super antispyware, Spybot search and destroy, Avast antivirus.

 

Not better after defrag. Both boot time and running. 3 mins boot. Several mins opening docs, programs etc

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Guest Keatah

Something in CCleaner might have "reset" something in the mal-ware scanners. And now they're starting from scratch and re-scanning everything. An operation that could take some time.

 

It's never a good idea to run more than one security package. They just end up duplicator or fighting each other's activities.

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Is it appropriate to consider restoring the Registry backups that were suggested when cleaning the registry.

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While it's good to have layered security from multiple anti-malware products and since you're on WinXP I'd let Avast have real-time enabled and only Avast. Too many running real-time protection shields from multiple products can slow down WinXP, even if those products claim they won't conflict with each other.

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All sensible replies. If it were me I'd start with some general stuff:

 

-restore backup registry through ccleaner if possible

-temporarily disable or even uninstall all protection (one by one re-install but like said, Avast alone should be 'sufficient')

-check msconfig / services.msc for unneeded startup-items / processes

 

Also check your task-manager (ctrl-alt-del) for processes eating up too much resources.

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-restore backup registry through ccleaner if possible

 

Let's not confuse people - It's never been possible to restore a registry backup made by CCleaner through CCleaner itself. It saves .reg files that can be double-clicked to merge/restore the data back in.

 

-temporarily disable or even uninstall all protection (one by one re-install but like said, Avast alone should be 'sufficient')

Avast being the only resident/real-time protection should be enough, however other things like say Malwarebytes Anti-Malware will still be necessary even as a freeware edition to do on-demand scans to find stuff that Avast can't.

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As a test disable you security software and run ccleaner.

Tried that

 

Something in CCleaner might have "reset" something in the mal-ware scanners. And now they're starting from scratch and re-scanning everything. An operation that could take some time.

 

It's never a good idea to run more than one security package. They just end up duplicator or fighting each other's activities.

It's had time to clear. I've been advised that what one security package misses another picks up

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IDK.. maybe not. I'd try finding the source of the slowdown and go from there.

That's the reason for my query - how do I find the source?

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While it's good to have layered security from multiple anti-malware products and since you're on WinXP I'd let Avast have real-time enabled and only Avast. Too many running real-time protection shields from multiple products can slow down WinXP, even if those products claim they won't conflict with each other.

I've had WinXP and the security products for years without slow running until recently

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All sensible replies. If it were me I'd start with some general stuff:

 

-restore backup registry through ccleaner if possible

-temporarily disable or even uninstall all protection (one by one re-install but like said, Avast alone should be 'sufficient')

-check msconfig / services.msc for unneeded startup-items / processes

 

Also check your task-manager (ctrl-alt-del) for processes eating up too much resources.

How do I know what to remove from the processes?

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Guest Keatah

It is a tedious process, no pun intended.

 

You need to let the system settle down into a quiescent state.

Then you look at each and every process.

You use google to research each one of those processes.

You make note of the ones consuming high amounts of CPU resources.

 

Also look at overall memory usage. If you have 2GB ram, for example, there should be generally no more than 10-20% ram in use right after the system settles down. Just look at the graph.

 

My system has 34 processes, each one accounted for. And 256mb when the system goes idle.

Each computer is different. So these are guidelines.

 

Report back with any anomalies.

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Also look at overall memory usage. If you have 2GB ram, for example, there should be generally no more than 10-20% ram in use right after the system settles down.

 

The only thing though is Windows Task Manager can't be relied upon with any confidence to determine how much RAM is actually being used, I often think/know Windows Task Manager is lying. A freeware memory manager (without using it's RAM flushing) is a quick way to figure out how much RAM is being used and how much is available, and how much of the pagefile is in use and available.

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they have given Task Manager a pretty good going-over with Win8, it should be much more trust-worthy.

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Guest Keatah

Accurate? Maybe, maybe not. Consistent? Yep.

 

From time to time I check the memory after a bootup and the system has settled down. It was always at 256MB. Consistently. For months, years. I made a few changes and it dropped by 10. It works for me. And it's been improved since xp.

 

I suppose I should've placed emphasis on cpu usage. Gross changes. 0% 50% 100%

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