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Disable your java

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Never needed java in last 2 years.

 

Therefore no java installed :) Java exploits are many these days.

 

Flash I need most days.

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Never needed java in last 2 years.

 

Therefore no java installed :) Java exploits are many these days.

 

Flash I need most days.

 

+1, sort of.

On wxp, I run virtualized all the time, and install java as needed, maybe 3 or 4 times in the last 2 years.

After a restart, java and exploits and all else for that session is gone.

My bank doesn't need java, if they did I would go in person and pitch a fit. :P

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I think it's good to be concerned about the security of our computers and software on it. But removing every software that could possibly be exploited would mean removing everything, including Windows itself!

 

I have been using Windows since 1994, and I never had any security issues with any software.

 

Keeping computers safe means

  1. updating software when updates become available
  2. responsible web surfing
  3. creating regular backups
  4. firewall and up-to-date AV

not necessarily in that order. I have and keep Java, although I do not use it often. I have and keep Flash Player, although I do not use it often. I have lots of other software that receive regular security updates, and it does not worry me.

 

Too much worry may lead to stomach ulcers B)

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Keeping computers safe means

  1. updating software when updates become available
  2. responsible web surfing
  3. creating regular backups
  4. firewall and up-to-date AV

 

+1. Add to that list 2 more items;

  1. Emails. Lost count the number of PC's I've had to service because the user opened a crap email that they were just too damn curious not to or too lazy to read properly and simply clicked on imbeded links without thinking.
  2. Maintenance. ccleaner, defraggler, malwarebytes, registry mechanic

 

Touch wood, I've also been using Windows for decades with only one infection which my neighbour gave me on a floppy (ahh, floppies, good days)

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and of course the same goes for Java and any other plug-in or what-have-you.

 

In my views the same does not go for Java for the simple fact it isn't widely used.

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  1. Emails.

Most good AV systems should take care of that, and move infected items into some virus vault. (This may not work for webmail.)

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I think it's good to be concerned about the security of our computers and software on it. But removing every software that could possibly be exploited would mean removing everything, including Windows itself!

. . .

Too much worry may lead to stomach ulcers B)

 

You are quite right about those safety precautions, they are all good, especially the backups.

 

I must say though that responsible web surfing, in other words "common sense", is overrated. Several times over the last few years I have encountered viruses on normal, ordinary sites, not questionable ones. Once last week while searching for SATA drivers, once a while back on a yahoo news link, and others. One of them got past everything and restarted this computer. Never will know what that was.

 

If you run a good virtualizer app, it provides a valuable "last line of defense". All those were gone after a restart. So worries are reduced.

 

As far as installing software and updates, you just do that before starting your virtualizer. I always try things out with Powershadow (PS) running, and if they are worth keeping, I install them the next time I restart, before turning PS on. Like JAVA . . . it is needed so rarely that I just install it temporarily if I really want it. Doesn't take long.

 

I've been banging this drum on here for years, because just one "common sense" breach can require hours of repair time, and it isn't really necessary. Still, the idea of running virtualized by default, so to speak, doesn't seem to be catching on. But then hey, windows has only been around about 26 years, so maybe any day now . . . :P

 

Just my 2 cents. :)

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OK, to clear up this JAVA not needed opinion.

Can we start a list of what JAVA actually is used for and where/when someone may require it?

 

I believe Minecraft, iTunes and some web bank sites require it?

Correct ?? What are any others?

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I only use iTunes for 3 podcast subscriptions, nothing to do with actual tunes. When I uninstalled Java earlier it didn't affect my iTunes podcast subscriptions. Maybe it needs Java for tunes or something else? Every once in a blue moon some corporate or gubmint site will require Java. I use Waterfox with NoScript, AdBlocker Plus, Ghostery. If it's a legit site I'll allow Java and Flash to run.

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A lot of the sites my university used required java. I had a class that used a java based video conferencing software(cant remember the name) and it was absolutely awful.

One plus to google chrome is that if you have an old version of java installed it wont run java plug ins. It actually prompts you to inform you that your java is out of date and asks each time you try to run it until you get the update. Annoys the hell out of me but it also makes me update java(something I never do).

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I believe Minecraft, iTunes and some web bank sites require it?

Correct ?? What are any others?

The two most popular softwares using Java are OpenOffice and LibreOffice. Not all components require it; just some (like Base). LibreOffice is trying to get away from Java, while OpenOffice now belogs to Oracle, like Java, so the two will most likely stay together.

 

One of my favorite diskspace analyzing tools, JDiskReport, uses Java.

 

Web tools requiring Java; I know just a few: Secunia OSI, hardware manufacturers' (Intel, AMD, Nvidia, ...) device driver checking tools (but they use ActiveX Controls on Internet Explorer).

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One plus to google chrome is that if you have an old version of java installed it wont run java plug ins.

 

I believe Firefox does the same thing, it'll disable the Java plugin if it is outdated.

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We're currently learning Java at uni. The language is as bad (if not worse) than the runtime environment.

 

It's also a sick irony that I've spent the last year writing an app to remove Java, only to later forced to use Java daily.

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Guest Keatah

I totally dislike JAVA and FLASH applications. Pretty much anything that needs to get done can get done without the use of those things. However, that doesn't mean I don't use it. But if presented with two varieties of apps, I'll take the non-flash or non-java version.

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Guest Keatah

And despite all misgivings about JAVA, both from me and "Security" firms, I'm not about to go turning it off or anything. Turning Java (and flash) off and unloading it breaks some important financial applications, not to mention stupid youtube vids. Can't have that, now can we? Besides, the folks recommending this..this.. disable Java, disable, this, disable that.. usually have some sort of ulterior motive, to sell you something. Some security package or something.

 

Listen, if there's any new exploit or serious problem, Oracle is going to get on the ball and fix it. In the meantime, just visit websites you know and trust. Doing this one action is the best way to avoid PC problems in the first place!

 

Virus-free and Malware free in over 40 years of computing! Just by following common sense.

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Good, 'take a step back and see the bigger picture' wrap-up Keatah.

 

People should stick to whatever gives them the best PC usage experience.

If someone doesn't like, for example, what iTunes does, there are alternatives. But for the global masses, most of the stuff works most of the time.

 

Personally and maybe luckily, I've always setup PC's with the usual package of software, like Java, Flash, Shockwave, iTunes, Office etc, and haven't (yet !) had any major issues. Why?, the vast majority of people use them, like them and they just work. BUT, there's always a couple of bumps along the road with any software. Hell, I reckon every software company (this one included) would release a bug or two over its lifetime. But we still use the products.

 

I also will happily try a new product, like Foxit over Adobe, or Firefox over IE, and embrace it if I find any benefit in doing so, but I'm not going to cut off my nose to spite my face as the saying goes.

 

But this thread has been an eye-opener on maybe just how little Java is used in the real world and the level of hatred (maybe too strong a word!!!) towards it.

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But this thread has been an eye-opener on maybe just how little Java is used in the real world and the level of hatred (maybe too strong a word!!!) towards it.

 

I don't think it's "hatred" towards Java, more like a major security concern of having a browser plugin that can destroy your system via Java-based malware which was one of my motivations to never use it again, coupled with the only thing I ever used it for was the Trend Micro HouseCall online virus scanning service - other than that it was useless on my hard disk.

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I don't disagee with your comments or concerns Andavari, I just think we would all be alarmed at the potential security flaws in lots of the software we have our trust in.

 

Lets face it, we happily use the stuff blissfully unware until it bites us on the bum :o

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We're currently learning Java at uni. The language is as bad (if not worse) than the runtime environment.

Just curious; in what way "bad", and compared to what other languages?

 

I have never written anything in Java, but it appears to be pretty similar to C++ (which is pretty bad; its string handling capabilities are extremely limited).

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Virus-free and Malware free in over 40 years of computing! Just by following common sense.

Wow - you have been as long in the business as I have (started 1970 on IBM 360 systems, using assembler and PL/I).

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