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Are few quick defrags the same as one "ordinary" defrag?

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If I'm using quick defrag more often, will it be good enough as full defrag? In other words, will quick defrag do exactly the same work as full defrag, or full defrag can't never be replaced by it no matter how often it is used?

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The only difference I think it's that a common regular defrag also consolidates free space (fill gaps). That's why it's very time consuming. I don't use it. I prefer to defrag from the file list.

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The only difference I think it's that a common regular defrag also consolidates free space (fill gaps). That's why it's very time consuming. I don't use it. I prefer to defrag from the file list.

 

I asked the question what the standard default defrag does exactly but received no response.

 

It's not in the documentation...

 

You can use Defraggler to perform a standard defragmentation, or you can run a Quick Defrag. The Quick Defrag will run much more quickly, but will not have as optimal a result as the standard defrag.

 

 

I don't think free space consolidation should take a very long time. Of course it would depend on how much data and how long it's been since the last defrag.

 

I'm wondering if the standard default defrag is also moving system files to the faster part of the disk.

 

I've used another defrag program weekly where defrag and free space consolidation takes 10 minutes on both of my systems.

 

Bottom line is quick defrag or defraging from the file list are great, but they leave gaps that promote fragmentation.

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I asked the question what the standard default defrag does exactly but received no response.

 

It's not in the documentation...

 

 

 

 

I don't think free space consolidation should take a very long time. Of course it would depend on how much data and how long it's been since the last defrag.

 

I'm wondering if the standard default defrag is also moving system files to the faster part of the disk.

 

I've used another defrag program weekly where defrag and free space consolidation takes 10 minutes on both of my systems.

 

Bottom line is quick defrag or defraging from the file list are great, but they leave gaps that promote fragmentation.

 

Wrong. Depending on the size of your partition it can take AGES, because DF tends to tigh-pack everything and thus it shuffles a lot of data (data that is not even fragmented).

 

As far as I know, Defraggler doesn't perform any system files optimization placement at all (so far).

 

Your mileage may vary among defragmenters...

 

Regards.

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Wrong. Depending on the size of your partition it can take AGES, because DF tends to tigh-pack everything and thus it shuffles a lot of data (data that is not even fragmented).

 

As far as I know, Defraggler doesn't perform any system files optimization placement at all (so far).

 

Your mileage may vary among defragmenters...

 

Regards.

 

Yes, I understand that the size of a partition, and as I stated "it would depend on how much data and how long it's been since the last defrag" would have an impact on how long the process will take.

 

All I'm saying is that many comments have been made on how long it takes Defraggler to finish its default defrag routine.

 

Your replys have consisted of "I think" and "as far as I know" when it comes to what Defraggler is doing during its default defrag routine.

 

As much as I appreciate your input, I'd like to know as a matter of fact if Defraggler is using a complex algorithm or is it's engine just slow.

 

In the last update there was work done on speed and algorithms. Perhaps the program just needs a little more time to mature into the class that CCleaner has.

 

Overall I really like Defraggler, but like you and others I mostly use quick defrag or the file list. Which of course over time will promote fragmentation.

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The thing that confusing me the most is that I'm getting good results with quick defrag + defrag from file list. So I was wondering why to use ordinary defrag at all. Now I'm keeping fragmentation at 6% (C:) and 4% (D:) easily and quickly on that way witch looks pretty satisfying to me. So, why wasting hours to get the same percentage with the ordinary defrag??? There must be some adventage of ordinary defrag. I would just like to know what it is.

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The thing that confusing me the most is that I'm getting good results with quick defrag + defrag from file list. So I was wondering why to use ordinary defrag at all. Now I'm keeping fragmentation at 6% (C:) and 4% (D:) easily and quickly on that way witch looks pretty satisfying to me. So, why wasting hours to get the same percentage with the ordinary defrag??? There must be some adventage of ordinary defrag. I would just like to know what it is.

 

Quick defrag + defrag from the file list will defrag files but leave behind gaps. These gaps will be filled with new files. If the whole file can't fit in one of the spaces, then the remaining part of the file will be written in the next space and so on. This would be a fragmented file because it's not one continuous file.

 

As eL_PuSHeR stated, the regular defrag will add free space consolidation. This means files will be moved around to fill those gaps in an attempt to create one continuous block. This will help prevent fragmentation of new files. Keep in mind that when you delete a file or uninstall a program you just created gaps. Keeping the file system always gap free wouldn't be possible.

 

Defrag programs use different optimizing algorithms and since the the online documentation of Defraggler doesn't go into detail of the process, we can only speculate on the exact process.

 

I follow Piriforms advise by using analyze and then determine what action I will take.

 

1) Do nothing.

2) Quick defrag or from the file list. (I use daily to weekly)

3) Defrag (I use weekly to monthly)

 

If you change this setting you should see 0% fragmentation after defraging.

 

Settings > Options > Advanced > check box for "Use custom fragmentation settings" click on Define > check boxes for exclude restore point file and hibernation file > click ok ok

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Quick defrag + defrag from the file list will defrag files but leave behind gaps. These gaps will be filled with new files. If the whole file can't fit in one of the spaces, then the remaining part of the file will be written in the next space and so on. This would be a fragmented file because it's not one continuous file.

 

As eL_PuSHeR stated, the regular defrag will add free space consolidation. This means files will be moved around to fill those gaps in an attempt to create one continuous block. This will help prevent fragmentation of new files. Keep in mind that when you delete a file or uninstall a program you just created gaps. Keeping the file system always gap free wouldn't be possible.

 

Defrag programs use different optimizing algorithms and since the the online documentation of Defraggler doesn't go into detail of the process, we can only speculate on the exact process.

 

I follow Piriforms advise by using analyze and then determine what action I will take.

 

1) Do nothing.

2) Quick defrag or from the file list. (I use daily to weekly)

3) Defrag (I use weekly to monthly)

 

If you change this setting you should see 0% fragmentation after defraging.

 

Settings > Options > Advanced > check box for "Use custom fragmentation settings" click on Define > check boxes for exclude restore point file and hibernation file > click ok ok

 

Thanks for making it clear now. And yep, I already used those custom settings. After I do one full defrag, it will probably show 0%. Now I'm ok with 5/6%.

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Thanks for making it clear now. And yep, I already used those custom settings. After I do one full defrag, it will probably show 0%. Now I'm ok with 5/6%.

 

It doesn't matter which way you defrag with Defraggler as far as what % is still fragmented when your done. It should be the same unless you defrag only some files from the file list way. The full defrag adds more than just defraging the file system.

 

What files do you see in the file list when you analyze after defraging? They may be unmovable files.

 

Edit: I never thought of looking at the technical information part of the documentation. D'oh!

 

Technical Information

 

 

What Defraggler does

Defraggler scans the hard drive for folders and files that are scattered in non-contiguous clusters (clusters that aren't right next to each other). Using a single-pass algorithm, it designs an optimum layout for these files so that Windows will spend the least amount of time retrieving them in the future. Finally, Defraggler moves the files into this optimum pattern.

 

 

This explains why Defraggler takes a long time to complete its routine using the defrag button. It's doing a defragment and optimize routine more complex than just free space consolidation. I now know this because Defragglers equivalent to free space consolidation is called Defragmenting freespace.

 

My new routine will be...

 

Analyze then defrag from the file list (check all) then Defragment Freespace in Normal Mode (weekly)

 

Badabing! Badaboom!

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I have never noticed any big improvement by using regular defrag over the file list one. And regular defrag can be quite time consuming. And as far as I know Defraggler doesn't take into account layout.ini or anything else inside the prefetch folder. I could be wrong though.

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I have never noticed any big improvement by using regular defrag over the file list one. And regular defrag can be quite time consuming. And as far as I know Defraggler doesn't take into account layout.ini or anything else inside the prefetch folder. I could be wrong though.

 

I'm just going to use Analyze then defrag from the file list (check all) then Defragment Freespace in Normal Mode (weekly) and see what happens. I agree that the regular defrag can be time consuming and not to mention the wear and tear on a hard drive.

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