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Java update installs McAfee

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This isn't helping me much. I guess I'm gonna have to try uninstalling JavaScript and see what works and what doesn't. Kinda scary scenario.

 

Java has nothing to do with JavaScript.

Java is an interpreted programming language for cross-platform desktop applications.

JavaScript is a script language used everywhere on the web (including on this forum).

 

Your browser contains a JavaScript interpreter ; you cannot uninstall it.

However, you can uninstall Java from your computer, and most likely all your apps will still work.

 

(If I could travel back in time and slap the guy who said "why don't we name this script language JavaScript"....)

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Well it seems to me that Java and JavaScript (and Java Runtime) are all one inseparable package when I install it from Filehippo.

 

If I uninstall Java, which I get from Filehippo, my FF browser will still have JavaScript abilities due to its built-in extension?

 

And what about downloadable games from Big Fish? Do any of them run on basic Java?

 

You know what? If it ain't broke, don't fix it. My machine is running fine and clean.

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Wow, I would've never expected that much.:o

 

I was concerned as when I saw the total. Almost backed out. I use the iobituninstaller and it give you a total of the entries uninstalled, unlike Revo uninstaller. I saw the iobit mentioned on the forum once, think it was here, so tried it. For example I used Revo once to clean after a reformat and thought all was well. Once I got iobit I notice that Napster was still on my system, or an entry was still there. That convinced me to us iobit.

 

Thanks for all the information you have furnished about this.

 

Regards,

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Well it seems to me that Java and JavaScript are all one inseparable package when I install it from Filehippo.

 

They aren't.

Java and JavaScript are two completely different things.

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And what about downloadable games from Big Fish? Do any of them run on basic Java?

 

You know what? If it ain't broke, don't fix it. My machine is running fine and clean.

 

Why don't you just get rid of it, and see how it goes. It wouldn't cost you anything to simply install the latest version again if you find you really need it.

 

It's a shame to carry a bloated installation of something you don't need, and does occasionally throw up critical vulnerabilities.

 

Just a thought.

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Why don't you just get rid of it, and see how it goes. It wouldn't cost you anything to simply install the latest version again if you find you really need it.

Dennis, would an uninstall under Returnil work just to test out a few apps?

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Dennis, would an uninstall under Returnil work just to test things out?

 

Returnil allows you to make a complete save of your computer and use it without actually doing anything on your computer, if I remember correctly?

That should work.

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Well, I just uninstalled Java using its own uninstaller. So why do I still have the Java control panel? :unsure:

 

Never mind, I uninstalled the 64 bit I found just now.

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Dennis, would an uninstall under Returnil work just to test out a few apps?

 

I would say that would work OK.

 

Any software you try after doing the "virtual" uninstall of Java, would be running in the clone of the Operating System in memory, which will obviously be Java-less. You would get the same result as you would doing a real uninstall of Java.

 

Saying that, I could have tried the "virtual" uninstall myself some time back, but with Java being free, and having to be updated fairly regularly, I decided to get rid of it for real and re-install the latest version if I eventually found I needed it.

 

With Returnil being a short lived "state" (gone after reboot), it isn't really long enough to find out if it's needed or not.

 

Personal choice of course. Whatever works best for you.

:)

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After reading this discussion I've uninstalled all things Java from both my machines, but on my XP desktop I've discovered all these Java Console extensions in Firefox 4 "add-ons". Java Console 6.0.12 and 6.0.17 and 6.0.23 and so on. There's no button to remove them within FF as there are the other extensions, Adblock Plus or Forecast Fox for example. There's only a button to enable or disable them. I don't recall ever installing them, and on my Windows 7 laptop, again using Firefox 4, they're not there listed as extensions at all. Where did these come from and why no obvious way to remove them? Any ideas how to get rid of these, or is simply ticking them as "disabled" all I need to do? I'd like to see them gone.

 

Edit: I went to C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\extensions\ and deleted all the subfolders beginning with "CAFEEFAC-0016" and now all the extensions are gone. Yippee!

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There's no button to remove them within FF as there are the other extensions

They had started automatically installing a Firefox plugin "Java Quick Start Firefox Addon" or something along those lines ( I'm not sure that's the actual name of it) sometime ago with no means for the user to even opt-out. That was one of the nails in its coffin being on my system anymore, I quickly dumped it after they started doing that.

 

I don't know if deleting those leftover folders also gets rid of the registry settings or not for the plugin, therefore you may also have remnants of it leftover in Firefox's registry located in a sub-key at:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Mozilla
-or-
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\MozillaPlugins

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Wait, I thought all the "java" in FF was JavaScript (not actually 'Java'), or so I've been led to believe.

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Wait, I thought all the "java" in FF was JavaScript (not actually 'Java'), or so I've been led to believe.

Via the Java Runtime Environment it would install a Firefox plugin, that's how Java was accessible to Firefox for any websites that may still use it, i.e.; like sometime ago Trend Micro HouseCall ("free online virus scan") website used it, I don't know if they still do or not. However it's getting very rare to see a website that requires it anymore.

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I don't know if deleting those leftover folders also gets rid of the registry settings or not for the plugin, therefore you may also have remnants of it leftover in Firefox's registry located in a sub-key at:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Mozilla
-or-
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\MozillaPlugins

 

I'm not too comfortable tinkering around in the registry, and since CCleaner's registry scanner isn't finding them I'm going to assume they aren't there. ;)

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I'm not too comfortable tinkering around in the registry

That's all the more reason to not manually edit it, better safe than sorry!;)

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I'm going to pretend it does. ;)

I'm going to pretend I'm a fire-engine (since we're pretending non-existant things) ROFL B)

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I'm going to pretend I'm a fire-engine (since we're pretending non-existant things) ROFL B)

 

And I'm going to pretend that I'm an Old Man and believing that all this over and over, and more than over stuff is real.

 

I deleted every thing that looked like JAVA based on what Andavari said many posts ago. Nothing bad has happened, have yet to have a failure with anything.

 

You guys are confusing me! :(

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I'm going to pretend it does. ;)

Nope. CCleaner's Registry scanner, like its Cleaner, only deletes what it is told to ; keys in certain hives which match some filters (e.g. non-existent target)

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I'm surprised this "keep it or get rid of it" question is still going, and I say that with all due respect to all you guys.

 

Java is no big thing, either get rid of it and see how long you go before a message box pops on screen saying "you need Java installed to properly view this web page", or keep it installed.

 

It really is that straightforward, and if nothing else, if you eventually find you do need it you can give yourself a nice fresh install of the latest version.

 

Back when I got rid it, I knew less than you guys have learned from this thread, and the only way I would know if it was a good idea or not was to bin it and find out. Two and a half years later, I've come to the conclusion that I definitely didn't need it.

 

We have enough security issues from essential software, without having a large software package installed which we probably don't need, and which is also prone to security issues.

 

It's personal choice guys, only you can decide if you want it or not.

:)

 

EDIT: If you ever trawl through the registry looking for something in particular, you'll come across keys from all sorts of software you got rid of in the past. That's the nature of the registry unfortunately. You'll never get rid of everything.

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EDIT: If you ever trawl through the registry looking for something in particular, you'll come across keys from all sorts of software you got rid of in the past. That's the nature of the registry unfortunately. You'll never get rid of everything.

I'd describe that as a problem with bad uninstallers in general (yes, Symantec and McAfee, I'm looking at you) rather than a Registry problem.

 

Like you, I got rid of Java a long time ago....the only software I ever used that needed Java was a World of Goo patcher.

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I'd describe that as a problem with bad uninstallers in general (yes, Symantec and McAfee, I'm looking at you) rather than a Registry problem.

 

 

 

Yep, that's probably more accurate.

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