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Augeas

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Posts posted by Augeas


  1. I'm not sure what you actually mean by formatting temp internet files. CC will overwrite these files (if the option is selected) which makes them unrecoverable by any method. One overwrite is sufficient. Formatting, at its most secure, is simply overwriting physical areas of the disk.

     

    It was a little tongue in cheek to mention another security method. Temp internet files from an individual's surfing can be overwritten adequately by CC. If you have access to very sensitive data, such as that which seems to be handled so nonchalantly by our leaders, then your PC should be subject to a security procedure which (amongst other things) sees it physically secured at all times, fully password protected, no access by any other person, data encrypted and at the end of its use by you the hard drive removed and physically destroyed. But that isn't what most people will do because they aren't in a position to access such sensitive data.

     

    Rgds.


  2. You may well be right. I have the don't delete until 48 hrs box ticked and my ..../me/local settings/temp folder has files going back to my pc setup a year or more ago. I don't have too many so it doesn't bother me. If you're only worried about keeping some files for 48 hrs then why not wait a few days and then clear the temp folder? Cheers.


  3. It depends. If you don't have the option ticked in your browser to delete temp files at any time, if you have the delete temp internet files ticked in CCleaner, if you use the secure deletion one pass in CC settings, then the temp internet files will be overwritten and not recoverable.

     

    The index.data files have info on url's visited. If you use CC to remove them then they will be deleted on PC reboot. However they will not be overwritten by CC no matter what option you have chosen (as CC is not doing the deletion). But the space they occupy will be overwritten in time as you create new files (new temp internet files, for instance).

     

    Are there any other traces of your browsing hanging around? Quite possibly, as I don't know what Windows writes in its swap files, logs, etc. They will not be accessible to the casual user.

     

    There may be other quirks, such as a file being edited and a shorter version being replaced. Does CC remove the spare part of the cluster if the file is deleted? I doubt it. CC is a home use computer cleaner, perfectly adequate for the vast majority of computer users, and sufficient to remove data from the view of all but the most determined and skilled investigator. If you have been accessing data vital to the security of the realm then I'd put another security method into operation.

     

    Rgds.


  4. What size does Recuva say is the deleted file? What file organisation is the hd? Are you sure you have plenty of spare space (not on the external hd!) to recover the file? How much have you written to the hd since the file deletion?

     

    Disconnect the hd now until this forum and you have a) recovered the file, or B) given up.


  5. Do you mean that CC Analyser produces a report and then starts again? Or that the little green bar at the top of the window makes many passes?

     

    If the former then I've never heard of that happening. If the latter, as I rather suspect, it's just taking a long time to analyse, as Rhoney says. Wait until it's finished and then run Clean. If you use CC weekly (say) then you won't get such a large buildup of obsolete files and Analyse will be speedy.

     

    Rgds.


  6. Hmm, 30 gb is rather a lot to lose. You can't undo what Recuva has done. A run of Recuva will do very little apart from creating a few log files which will of course overwrite something or other. Using Recuva to recover files - 30 gb of them - most certainly will do something. If, as Ron asks, you have recovered these files to the same drive then they will have overwitten 30 gb of what is flagged as free space, which may or may not have been part of the 30 gb you were tying to recover. So in theory you could have had 30 gb of recoverable files, and the first file recovered overwrote the next file to be recovered, and so on to the end of the 30 gb. In practice it's probably partly what has happened.

     

    Also every time you boot up or use your PC you will be overwriting files. Windows is always writing something or other, and surfing is ten times as bad. Even posting to this site kills something.

     

    Rgds.


  7. I can only think of two reasons why you should 'do' something after running Recuva. The first is that you inadvertently deleted a file and you wish to recover it, and the second is that a file containing sensitive data has been deleted and Recuva shows it as being recoverable.

     

    In the first case, try to recover the file as soon as possible, as it will, sooner or later, be overwritten when another new file is created. In the second case you can do very little, but this file too will eventually be overwritten with a new file (so just keep your eye on it).

     

    If you wish to do neither of these things then you have to do nothing at all after running Recuva. Files do get created and deleted every time you use your PC. It's normal. Recuva just lets the curious look at them.

     

    Rgds.


  8. If you have nothing on your PC that you want to hide from others then set the delete option to Normal File deletion. This is very fast. The deleted files will sooner or later be overwritten anyway as you create new files.

     

    If you have files you want to be securely deleted then set the delete option to Simple Overwrite 1 Pass. This overwrites your files with zeros, and is a little slower.

     

    There is no point in overwriting files multiple times, it just prolongs the action and ever-so-slightly dimishes the life of your hard drive. No file has ever been recovered in the history of computing, as far as I and zillions of others know, after being overwritten.

     

    I'm afraid that if you want an answer to your question then you will have to come back here: it's not too much to ask, is it?

     

    Rgds.


  9. I asked because if you were using a multiple overwrite (which is a waste of time) and had a lot of data to delete then it might seem that CC is running forever.

     

    Assuming that you don't have hundreds of gbs to delete then I've no answer, except wait for the imminent new release. I usually delete around 10 to 20 gb at a time, and if I run Analyze first (which I don't do very often) it does take a modest time, about 1-2 seconds a gig. The delete however is very fast. So if you're just doing deletes then some time will be taken up with the analytical stage which you won't see.

     

    Rgds.


  10. How did you delete the files? The recycler will rename deleted files so you will have to search on deletion time or size, etc. You can scan quickly with Recuva watching the preview box if the deleted files are pics.

     

    If you used CCleaner to overwrite your files then that remanes them too. In this case they will, and can, never be recovered.

     

    Rgds.


  11. Just wondering, how does Recuva work? How does it locate fragments of files? Does it use Recycled(System folder) to locate fragments?

    I asked this question some time ago. There were over 1,000 views, but no response. As Recuva scans very quickly I think that it's unlikely to scan the entire disk. So I think the info comes from the file allocation tables that the O/S uses. These must be the old entries that have some deleted flag against them.

     

    As Recuva always allocates some name or other to the files, I don't think that it is picking up file sections or fragments from the disk, as they wouldn't have names associated with them. Also this fragmented data would be more or less noise to any software, all the software could do is report sectors as having data in them (and zeroes are data). These bits would generate an enormous report, and couldn't be recovered as files, so perhaps Recuva is taking the right decisions.

     

    Does it have any use(Recuva)? All the files i find is like .EX_ and .DL_ . Tried deleting a file and emptying the Recycle Bin, and used Recuva but it didnt show up. Only files with no meaning at all showed up-.-

    Well, you can recover files with it, as I have done. Circumstances will dictate whether the file you really want to recover can be found. I have to say though that I've never used Recuva (or anything else except backups) to recover a file that I've lost, I've only used it to check that a file I've deleted has really gone - and they all go eventually. Your filenames with no meaning could be from the Recycler's habit of renaming files it deletes.

     

    Rgds.


  12. None of the disk scrubbers will give you a clean drive, they just overwrite what's there with a different kind of rubbish (zeros, or random chars, etc.). What they may do is remove the file names from the file allocation table (or whatever it's called), giving you the impression that the disk is 'clean'. It isn't.

     

    Overwritten files aren't recoverable by anyone. Until recently CCleaner didn't overwrite all files it deleted when the secure deletion option was chosen. The current version does (in my experience), so you should be safe. I don't really worry about all those deleted file names that Recuva shows, although I am amazed that there are so many!

     

    Rgds.


  13. What do you mean by scan, analyse or run? I think you are saying that you are running CC with simple overwrite. What makes you think that it is overwriting multiple times? If it is the green progress bar then that does travel all the way several times in a run, but I would have thought that that was a progress indicator, not a sign that the same files are being overwritten several times.

     

    There have been complaints that CC runs rather slowly. I haven't found this myself, but this may be the source of your concern. Apparently the next (imminent) release will fix this.

     

    Gutmann? Don't bother with it. One overwrite is enough.

     

    Rgds.


  14. Recycler renames the files to something silly when it is cleared out, so you may have to search on date/time. I can't remember if it renames the file type as well, possibly it does, so searching for jpg won't find them. Recuva is excellent as it gives you a preview so you can flick through many files quickly.

     

    The bad news is that every time you touch Windows, run programs, etc you're overwriting what's been deleted, so be cautious. Don't reboot, don't post to this forum, don't do anything else if you can help it (even better if you have another pc to use), download Recuva to a flash drive, install it on, and run it from, that. You get the idea.

     

    Rgds.


  15. You could take the lack of replies from forum members as a good sign - nobody else seems to have this problem.

     

    It's highly likely to be a false positive by the AV software. My AV software, and I guess the AV software of the rest of the forum members, shows Recuva to be clean.

     

    Rgds.


  16. In my opinion (sorry AV) people will do what they want to do, not what others think they should do. Software applications should be more or less fool-proof, or at least intuitive so that they can be used immediately without ploughing through a manual. (I have not read any CC manual, I admit.)

     

    I think that the Cleaner section is indeed more or less foolproof with the standard ticks. Not a lot of damage can happen to a PC with this. Lost cookies and temp int files can be a nuisance but aren't life threatening. Where I think more caution is required is in the Reg Cleaner and Uninstall Application Sections. Some users think that they have to use these sections and press away happily, reducing their PC to a gibbering wreck. Perhaps nothing ticked here and a caution box in the header would help?

     

    Rgds.


  17. Do you mean that when you do a scan nothing is returned, or are you searching by file/path name? When you say blocked do you mean ignored?

     

    You can show all your deleted files by selecting 'Show Files in Hidden Sys Directories' and 'Show Zero Byte Files' in the Options box.

     

    Do you have anything entered in the Filename or Path box? This will restrict the results shown - to the point of zero.

     

    Are you using CCleaner secure deletion to delete files? This will alter the file names.

     

    Are you deleting to the Recycler and then emptying that? These deleted files will have altered names.

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