Jump to content
CCleaner Community Forums

Augeas

Moderators
  • Content count

    4,165
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by Augeas


  1. The deleted files will remain (if they still exist) on the drivre they were originally on. The recycler renames files sent to the recycle bin to two components named $I and $R + a set of random characters + the original file extension. Ignore the $I file, the $R is the one you want. Whether these names are kept on final deletion or reverted to the original does not seem to be clear. If you can't find anything then the files may well be gone forever. You could try a deep scan in this case, but it will not return file or folder names.


  2. Recuva does not put any file back where it originated from. If a recovery is done then the selected files will be copied to another location for the user to reinstate as required. Shortcuts are .lnk files and should be found, but can easily be recreated. I assume you have looked in the recycler?


  3. There's no published link that I'm aware of. The link is probably known to (let's be generous) a thousand users, against CC's claim of 6 billion downloads, which is statistially zero. Any link that's not published is unsupported, but Piriform staff have mentioned it and Piriform publishes MD5 hashes for the slim and portables. I don't know any other business that operates in such a bewildering way.

    This is of course not the answer to the problem raised in this thread, which is a running sore. To keep clear of this I use an old portable version. Yes, unsupported.


  4. Well, I'm sure some of this will be down to personal opinion, but if you want to avoid 'adversely affecting my SSD' then don't run any defragger against it. My HDD dating back to 2006 which was retired early this year has never been defragged and everything was well, just fine. On an SSD it would be just finer.

    It's worth remembering that fragmentation is a logical construct, it doesn't exist on the disk. All a disk knows is clusters, or pages, and some are used and some aren't. Fragmentation is defined in the MFT, and that's what is used to create the Defraggler display and percentages. Whilst a HDD might suffer some slight delay in fetching disparate clusters (but I never noticed) on an SSD the overhead is as minimal as it can get.

    Windows 10 does defrag SSDs if certain conditions have been met, as has been discussed here recently. But this is not to reduce fragmentation in general, but to eliminate the possibility of mass extents in snapshot volumes, a very particular and specific aim.

    That's my opinion, there will be others. It doesn't sound to me that you have an overwhelming need to defrag your drive. Whether your loss of space is normal Defraggler action I don't know.


  5. Simply reading a 1 tb disk (at around 150 mb a sec) should take about two hours, if my maths is correct. Recuva does rather more, it runs a normal scan first (which should be a few minutes only) and during the deep scan has to correlate the used (live) clusters with the unused, compare the first section of each cluster with a table of known file headers, build up a list in memory of what valid files it has found, and do all the other things I can't think of at the moment or just don't know about. In any event three days is silly. I doubt if anything good will come if Recuva ever finishes, but what it's doing heaven only knows. I guess it's an HDD, USB?


  6. And not many peanuts for all that. Avast's new chief executive Ondrej Vicek has waived his salary and bonus and will take just $1 a year indefinitely. He's also donating his $100,000 board fee to charity (he can still receive shares in the company's incentive plan).. The previous CE Vincent Steckler was paid $512,653 salary plus a bonus of $632,627 last year.

    When did Avast lose its ! by the way?

    I'll answer that myself. The original Avast! blob logo was designed in-house by Martin Novak in 2010. It was redesigned and lost the exclamation mark in late 2016.

     


  7.  

    22 hours ago, Andavari said:

    Really the Trim command should just be programmed and baked into every SSD made without the need for some outside source to run it.

    Unfortunately the reason why we have TRIM makes this impossible. There is no indication to the SSD controller that a page has been deleted. The deletion is executed by a change to the bit status in the cluster bit map metafile. Whilst the controller can see that a page has been updated, it doesn't know that the page is a bitmap, or what a bitmap is - or what a file is for that matter. So the O/S has to tell the SSD what to do, with TRIM.


  8. CCleaner is quite suitable for use on SSDs in its base objective, 'cleaning' junk files, which is a simple delete. The architecture of NAND flash make overwriting pages and blocks impossible for any software. Thus a secure delete, or a free space wipe (both of which overwrite pages) are pointless to attempt and impossible to execute.

    To add to Andavari's post, I think TRIM was available from Vista onwards, and SSD controllers have supported TRIM for I guess at least the last five years. The default is enabled. Win10 runs regular TRIMs for you by default.

    You may wish to use Recuva to look at your deleted files. Although you will still see a list of deleted file names (they're held in the MFT) if you switch to advanced mode and look at the file header you will see that they are all zeroes, even if you haven't used secure deleteion or wipe free space. That is the effect of TRIM, and may reassure you.


  9. Svchost.exe deleted? Hmm.

    I assume you want the file names removing, as the file content is probably not sensitive and is not available on an SSD with TRIM anyway. I also assume that the file system is NTFS.

    As what you are listing with Recuva is just a file name, and the contents have long gone, I would ignore them unless you have a specific reason to remove them. Remving (or overwriting) the file name is rather awkward, but you can do it yourself fairly efficiently.

    Run Recuva and estimate how far down the list the file names are. Create a folder with a random name anywhere. Create a small file in that folder with a random name with notepad or similar containing say, a few zeroes. Create another nine files so you have ten in total. Create another random named folder and copy your ten files into it. Repeat until you have ten folders and 100 files. Group the ten folders under another folder, and copy that ten times, giving you a thousand files. Carry on until you have created as many files as svchost.exe is down Recuva's list of files.

    Run Recuva again. If svchost.exe is still there it should be near to the top. If it's 100 from the top create/copy another 100 files. Run Recuva. Svchost should be gone. Delete all your folders. That's it.

     

×