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I have a defraggler tip which works on vista.


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#1 OFFLINE StevenFTW

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 06:14 PM

Ever noticed that on vista it doesnt defrag system volume information, WMITracing.log and SCM.EVM.

Well to drag these what you do is:

1.Enable the Super Administrator.
2.Then Defraggler on that windows account.

To enable Super Administrator you simply.

1.Go on Start, All programs, Accessories, Right click on Command Prompt and the Run As Administrator.
2.Type: "Net user administrator p£ssw0rD" (no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).
3.Type: "Net user administrator /active:yes" (again no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).

If you ever want to disable the Super Administrator you simply.

1.Go on Start, All programs, Accessories, Right click on Command Prompt and the Run As Administrator.
2.Type: "Net user administrator p£ssw0rD" (no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).
3.Type: "Net user administrator /active:no" (again no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).

This works on my computer and im using Windows Vista Home Premium SP1.

#2 OFFLINE davey

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 07:14 PM

Ever noticed that on vista it doesnt defrag system volume information, WMITracing.log and SCM.EVM.

This works on my computer and im using Windows Vista Home Premium SP1.

Hi Steven,
I am not even going to get into "defragging" do's and don'ts and "why's' and "therefore's".
What I do want to say is Thank You for going out of your way to share a bit of information and knowledge with us.
This is at the heart of the need and importance of having the freedom of information to all on the Internet.
Members like you are very important to all the other members of this forum.
In the past year or so it has been pretty hard to get information or methods and such as regards Vista and its various forms.
Luckily with the increased development of the Internet,users are getting new information quicker than in the past.
But it does take people like you to share with us.Thanks for the details as to what edition and version.
We have all seen how important that basic information is to other users.
WELCOME TO THE FORUM !!! :D
Thanks for becoming a member to share this,
:) davey

#3 OFFLINE tcoffeep

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 10:49 PM

I've noticed that when I use CCleaner prior to defragging with Defraggler, WMITracing.log and SCM.EVM stops them from being defragged. However, if I load up my computer with a restart after cleaning, and defrag, it gets everything but the System Volume Information areas.

In the root of every drive is a folder called "System Volume Information". If your drive is NTFS, the permissions on the folder are set so not even administrators can get in there. What's the big secret?

The folder contains information that casual interference could cause problems with proper system functioning. Here are some of the things kept in that folder. (This list is not comprehensive.)

* System Restore points. You can disable System Restore from the "System" control panel.
* Distributed Link Tracking Service databases for repairing your shortcuts and linked documents.
* Content Indexing Service databases for fast file searches. This is also the source of the cidaemon.exe process: That is the content indexer itself, busy scanning your files and building its database so you can search for them quickly. (If you created a lot of data in a short time, the content indexer service gets all excited trying to index it.)
* Information used by the Volume Snapshot Service (also known as "Volume Shadow Copy") so you can back up files on a live system.
* Longhorn systems keep WinFS databases here.

Taken from http://blogs.msdn.co...1/20/55764.aspx

Essentially, I'd be wary about doing anything with this folder. One way I clear it, is by making a manual system back-up, and deleting the rest of them, as mentioned here. Although, I think defragging in safe mode might help, too. I've not tried that route, though.

Hope this helps some.
QUOTE
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Scott R. Bakker, Why Fantasy and Why Now?

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#4 OFFLINE Plum

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Posted 29 June 2008 - 06:09 AM

Ever noticed that on vista it doesnt defrag system volume information, WMITracing.log and SCM.EVM.

Well to drag these what you do is:

1.Enable the Super Administrator.
2.Then Defraggler on that windows account.

To enable Super Administrator you simply.

1.Go on Start, All programs, Accessories, Right click on Command Prompt and the Run As Administrator.
2.Type: "Net user administrator p£ssw0rD" (no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).
3.Type: "Net user administrator /active:yes" (again no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).

If you ever want to disable the Super Administrator you simply.

1.Go on Start, All programs, Accessories, Right click on Command Prompt and the Run As Administrator.
2.Type: "Net user administrator p£ssw0rD" (no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).
3.Type: "Net user administrator /active:no" (again no quotations and use spaces) (basically type it as it is).

This works on my computer and im using Windows Vista Home Premium SP1.

Thank you Steven,
I also have Vista Home Premium and have just tried your Net User Administrator Command Prompt suggestion and have found yes indeed two of the three files Defraggler wouldn't defrag have now been defragged. However still Defraggler hasn't defragged the C:\ System Volume Information file which appears as: {ab6f4f74-3f83-11dd=828d-00a.... C:\ System Volume Information and size is 9,784,36....
That is now the only file not defragged on this computer.
Another seagate image backup file being a full backup of my laptop, which includes all Vista program files, i've found is the only other file defraggler of can't defrag however its an image file an image that includes the Toshiba hidden partition named "0". Reasoning behind my purchasing the Seagate 750 gig external drive was two fold, firstly it was to save a copy of the Vista Program files and secondly to have backup of Fax Machine share ware program ($30) being the only program i could locate that was capable of installing a fax driver in the printer folder in Home Basic or Premium versions of Vista. I use Defraggler on both drives and have found the program does an excellent job. Plum

#5 OFFLINE davey

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 03:25 AM

Hi Guys,
Just a little note to thank you all for your input on this subject.

Also wanted to point out that many experienced "defrag" users don't even bother with these files as they are constantly being deleted and created everyday.
As you know Vista System Restore files can be huge depending on the options you have set.They are this large because Vista creates better restore points than what was available in WinXP.It takes advantage of the newer PC increased speed,RAM capacity and storage capacity.
A better approach to personal "optimization" is to analyze how much space is really needed for your System Volume files and adjust accordingly. http://bertk.mvps.or...diskspacev.html Vista users
http://bertk.mvps.or.../diskspace.html WinXP users

However don't expect much performance benefit.Let's face it a tidier looking "defrag" map does not mean better system performance.
In most cases you are better off just leaving Windows do its thing as far as System Volume files and defragmentation is concerned.
Some few users need to "defrag" often.
Most users need to "defrag" less often to benefit from better system performance for a longer period of time than most believe.

WMI tracing logs can be turned off. http://msdn.microsof...686(VS.85).aspx
CCleaner deletes these logs anyhow.Why bother having them except for "special" occasions.

Best wishes,
:) davey

#6 OFFLINE joexoxeoj

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Posted 14 July 2008 - 10:39 AM

2-3 times a year on my home pc i decide to do some cleanup. i delete all the junk, disable system restore, and reboot (this removes all old sys restore points). then i run CCleaner followed by ad-aware and then a full defrag. While i dont recommend it for a regular user, if your really that interested you could try disabling system restore so that the files are not locked and then enabling it again once you are done.

i find that very often i forget to turn it back on, but personally i dont use it. i have it turned to the lowest storage setting possible. Hey, im good at what i do, but im not stupid enough to tempt fate.
:P

#7 OFFLINE cosmotopper

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 03:43 PM

Hi Guys,
Just a little note to thank you all for your input on this subject.

Also wanted to point out that many experienced "defrag" users don't even bother with these files as they are constantly being deleted and created everyday.
As you know Vista System Restore files can be huge depending on the options you have set.They are this large because Vista creates better restore points than what was available in WinXP.It takes advantage of the newer PC increased speed,RAM capacity and storage capacity.
A better approach to personal "optimization" is to analyze how much space is really needed for your System Volume files and adjust accordingly. http://bertk.mvps.or...diskspacev.html Vista users
http://bertk.mvps.or.../diskspace.html WinXP users

However don't expect much performance benefit.Let's face it a tidier looking "defrag" map does not mean better system performance.
In most cases you are better off just leaving Windows do its thing as far as System Volume files and defragmentation is concerned.
Some few users need to "defrag" often.
Most users need to "defrag" less often to benefit from better system performance for a longer period of time than most believe.

WMI tracing logs can be turned off. http://msdn.microsof...686(VS.85).aspx
CCleaner deletes these logs anyhow.Why bother having them except for "special" occasions.

Best wishes,
:) davey


Thanks to Piriform for a great lineup of elegant and excellent tools. At the risk of sounding paranoid (and based on 30 years experience dealing with the most pernicious monopoly in the history of US business practice), the problem with these two files isn't that they are, it's where they are. I have been trying to defrag my NTFS volume so I could shrink it down from 640GB to 40GB, so I could make room for installing a dual-boot Solaris10 on this machine. Unfortunately, whenever I try to use the Vista supplied 'Shrink' functions, they inform me that the minimum size I can shrink it to is around 300GB.

The folks at Microsoft don't really want anybody elses operating system on my PC. That's because they don't really consider my PC to be 'my PC', it's really their PC, and they're just letting me use it. I don't have any problem with them wanting to put a hibernate file, or a system restore file, or a big paging file on the volume. But why design a file system so the data clusters can't be organized any way an appropriately authorized admin wants them organized?

This is no coincidence. These log files showed up (in the middle of a nearly empty drive) only after I turned off the drive 'journaling' function, after I had removed the hibernate file, etc. etc. Yes, it's possible to turn that stuff off, but only after wading through the byzantine and self-obfuscated so-called 'knowledge base' provided by the mega-geeks up north of us here in Portland OR.

Hey Steve (Balmer), All I want to do is shrink the NTFS volume down a bit, I'm not kicking Vista totally off the machine. Why make it so damn difficult? Thankfully, 2-minutes with a Linux live-CD and I can fix it anyway, but why should I have to do that?

Thanks again for the great work you folks at Piriform do. I donated, I hope everyone else who uses these great utils does also.

#8 OFFLINE mr don

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 09:07 PM

Thanks to Piriform for a great lineup of elegant and excellent tools. At the risk of sounding paranoid (and based on 30 years experience dealing with the most pernicious monopoly in the history of US business practice), the problem with these two files isn't that they are, it's where they are. I have been trying to defrag my NTFS volume so I could shrink it down from 640GB to 40GB, so I could make room for installing a dual-boot Solaris10 on this machine. Unfortunately, whenever I try to use the Vista supplied 'Shrink' functions, they inform me that the minimum size I can shrink it to is around 300GB.

The folks at Microsoft don't really want anybody elses operating system on my PC. That's because they don't really consider my PC to be 'my PC', it's really their PC, and they're just letting me use it. I don't have any problem with them wanting to put a hibernate file, or a system restore file, or a big paging file on the volume. But why design a file system so the data clusters can't be organized any way an appropriately authorized admin wants them organized?

This is no coincidence. These log files showed up (in the middle of a nearly empty drive) only after I turned off the drive 'journaling' function, after I had removed the hibernate file, etc. etc. Yes, it's possible to turn that stuff off, but only after wading through the byzantine and self-obfuscated so-called 'knowledge base' provided by the mega-geeks up north of us here in Portland OR.

Hey Steve (Balmer), All I want to do is shrink the NTFS volume down a bit, I'm not kicking Vista totally off the machine. Why make it so damn difficult? Thankfully, 2-minutes with a Linux live-CD and I can fix it anyway, but why should I have to do that?

Thanks again for the great work you folks at Piriform do. I donated, I hope everyone else who uses these great utils does also.


Don't get me started. Not only that, but the fact that Vista has Anti-Copy mechanisms in it for true digital copies, built around DRM technology, invades your privacy & purchase with criminal-like WGA activation schemes. Let's face it. Windows is a scam/sham/crook!

There, I said what everyone else is afraid to! But it is true.

Now, that being said, the best way to run defraggler is this:

- Enable Super User account as described above
- Disable system restore
- Disable all unnecessary startup items & run CCleaner on all user accounts
- Logout of all user accounts, then restart & log into the Super User account you created in safe mode
- Run defraggler

It is also lots less wear on your drive to go ahead when you are formatting your drive next time, delete the partition & repartition it as 2 drives. Format the first one & use it for Windows. Use your second partition for your multimedia & create folders, for example: Audio/Documents/Pictures/Games/Videos

Now, whenever you have to defrag windows, scan for malware/viruses, your scan times are dramatically reduced while your other data is safe from most viruses on another partition, since most viruses will attack just things on the C: drive. Next time windows goes belly up, you can format the windows partition & not lose your data on the other partition.

Your harddisk/mem/software will work so much less harder, so much faster, & be under far less stress. Think of all the time you will save!

Now, for the biggie... Windows uses percentages for recycle bin use as well as system restore point creation. Default is 10% for each drive for recycle bin to use, & 12% for restore... On drives that are 2,000 GB (2 TB) this is 20 GB just for the minimum 1% size! If you have multiple partitions, a minimum of 20 GB is being wasted on each partition! You can, of course, turn these features off, but then you have no way to restore in the event of a disaster.

Me? I think harddisks are big enough now... I think MS should include a second option of specifying say for example, no more than 2 GB for recycle bin. By including percent by default, & the secondary size selector, MS can be sure the recycle bin is large enough on older computers while users can be sure that they don't waste space on newer systems.

Me? I think MS should just say there is a minimum 20 GB harddisk. 5 GB for windows install, 2 GB for recycle with option to set it higher or lower GB, & 4 GB for restore. Some programs would gain mimimal return for vastly faster CPU usage, so all MS programs should have a set recommended clock in them of say, if MS Calc did not require over 2 MHZ, that was all it was allocated! Same for all other programs, while if a program requests more, it is sent more.

Make a windows that will be stingy with mem, & allow programs that really need faster CPU or GPU use is, such as video encoding/transcoding/ripping!

#9 OFFLINE Makion

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 11:25 PM

Thanks a lot for the tip, but for some reason, i still can't get Defraggler to defrag the System Volume Files.

I tried to open "Super Administrator", but i have a few questions about it.

I'm live in Canada, so i have NO idea how to type the pound symbol, would it be $ for me? (it seemed to work with $, but i need to double check)
Also, am i suppose to exit the command prompt window, and then start defraggler.exe?

I still get the errors of being unable to defrag the system files, and these fragments are eating up 33GBs of space > >.

#10 OFFLINE Mosillivo

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 01:41 AM

I'm live in Canada, so i have NO idea how to type the pound symbol, would it be $ for me? (it seemed to work with $, but i need to double check)
Also, am i suppose to exit the command prompt window, and then start defraggler.exe?

I still get the errors of being unable to defrag the system files, and these fragments are eating up 33GBs of space > >.


The whole password with leet thing is entirely noobish. I may be wrong, but I'm probally right.
See, once upon a time, there were SMART PEOPLE... and these smart people learned a trick. That most routers have default passwords of... password! Then the idiots came, and rather than learn complex passwords such as 32gPry9Kql18 they though leet would be better. They were wrong, brute force hacking accounts for leet... and it has a "special characters" table (because the idiots thought that no one would ever guess they used special characters).

To be a little more clear, I "believe" you're just changing the admin's password from blank to something stupid (like p£ssw0rD only a noob would do that. jc0FJ4vZVk is a better password a million times over... hell PASSWORD is a better password than THAT). Just press and HOLD the windows key and then press R. That opens the run command line (of course, with vista, you can just "search" but I highly dislike that feature [mostly because they made the startmenu less responsive to "force" me to use search. I keep a clean start menu, highly organized... I KNOW where everything is...)

But again, just HOLD the windows key and press R, or open the start menu and search "CMD". Run it.
Now type:
net user administrator
Net user administrator /active:yes

and you're done, without the stupid leet.
In ADDITION, you can actually copy those two lines (as is, both at once) and right click the "bar" at the top of the window.
A menu should open up, select Edit, then paste... it SHOULD automatically execute both of them (or one, depending if you grabbed the "enter / line break" character.





RANT
Defrags Do's and Don'ts
Don't use defrags if you're an idiot.
Sorry for the harsh terminology but the fact is the CRAP that is Vista exists because "idiots" use computers. (And I don't mean UAC. Most of the advanced controls have been removed, and I'm not even certain there ARE registry hacks for all of them... so PLEASE, if you have NO IDEA what defragging does... don't use the tool.


Don't use Windows Vista Defrag.
Anyone who "claims" that Vista is some uber awesome operating system has some serious issues (davey). "System Restore" exists for idiots, dllcache? Idiots. If you're a person who
A) Downloads porn "codecs"
B) Watches Porn
C) In anyway what so ever utilizes the internet to get porn

You probably will get malware. YAY, you get to open up system restore! But other than that, it's rather hard to GET malware... thus making the whole need for system restore seem rather pointless. (Aside from drivers, that is... but a smart person would open up safe mode, uninstall the conflicting drivers and reinstall the old ones. Takes longer, but it doesn't take up 1GB of your hard drive to do it))

Of COURSE, dllcache is SUPERIOR to System Restore when it comes to simple conflicts (Vista doesn't have it?) but if you're not deleting system files... and not installing malware... and most certainly not doing anything cuckoo. You should never see a warning that warrants dllcache.

But I, on the other hand, use to have a drive image... so around 800mb and 3min to a perfect install of XP. Unfortunately I'm a little stuck right now while I hunt down drivers :blink:


Use a Defragger to "Compact" the HD. Now there are a few misconceptions (davey)...
a tighter defrag map means your computer gains a MASSIVE speedboost. On load. I procrastinated defragging so my boottime was quite horrible, but after bringing it down to 5% (from around 15% I believe) I noticed an immediate difference between loading times.

But you probally mean having it all blue right? Well WRONG AGAIN! Having low density clusters means that the hard drive will have to spin back to the high density area and then back to the individual low density clusters. Basically, more spinning less reading.

Now Windows Vista does a wonderful job at creating fragmented files (Seriously, I don't understand it... XP was never this bad), my guess would be Vista tries to manage the drive by placing files at the first availiable spot instead of tacking it onto the end. (I'm not certain if XP actually did that, or if I just kept my drive more compact... but having a 1gb file with 147 fragments is sad... worse is that I have 80% freespace).

But back on topic, a good defrager not only "compacts" the drive, it moves files closer to their repective files (such as files in "9gb game" will be close to eachother so the drive doesn't have to work so long and you have shorter load times (mostly between levels, but if textures aren't all in memory there "should" be a noticable difference there [expecally if the directory is heavily fragmented])


But there IS a problem. Some files are constantly modified (Such as the WMI log) so if those expand out, beyond the clusters allocated to it, it'll become fragmented. This is where "analysis" software comes into play. By taking copies of the (mft?) and comparing the changes, defrag software can determine the aproximate amound of buffer space that each file needs to be provided. An easier method involves simply comparing the "creation and modified" dates, but the "buffer space" is aproximated instead.

If a file, like WMI, fluctuates between 4 and 32MB then at it's lowest it'll have 28MB "around" the file, but not locked to the file. That means other files can get written into the bufferspace... expecally if new files aren't tacked onto the end instead of being put in the nearest availiable space. I'm not certain if the bufferspace can be locked (the MFT has bufferspace... but that's a special file right?) but even if you manage to lock it, you will mostlikely be reducing the availiable freespace in excahange for reducing fragmation


THIS is the tradeoff you have to consider. I'm not certain if Defraggler allocates bufferspace or not (I'm too lazy to find out... but ANYTHING is better than Vista's Defrag "Done in a few min or sevearl hours" [and no reports D:<, at least XP was kind enough to tell you that it didn't want to defrag everything]).


DO: Partition your hard drive to separate the operating system, programs, and "documents" from each other.
There are some cons... but this reduces fragmation by a Signifigant factor. "Documents" being the most modified files... including temp and temporary internet files. (At the very least, temp and temporary internet files should have their own partition. The biggest slowdown with large files because the computer will "copy" instead of "move" but do realize that both temp and internet can expand to, say 5GB, and contract back down.

Of course, your biggest boost will be boot time. Since removing most of the programs from C: will mostly leave just the "system files" your HD "SHOULD" have a less difficult time locating the requested filles (at boot) and loading them into memory. Several "boot optimizers" do this artifically by locating files that are loaded at boot and putting them all in the front of the drive.


DO: Disable System Restore. Again, only if you're doing something stupid do you need this. Most people who find themselves in a situation that they might benifit from using it, don't even know how to activate it at boot (because a virus can either disable the system restore... or even allow it but infect system restore files... or even while it is restoring!) The benifits are mostly apperant if you mess around with the system. (You should NOT use system restore as a BACKUP. That is STUPID. System restore will not only restore the lost document, by may overwrite other doccuments that had been modified)

DO: Use defraggler (but don't quick defrag except to clear the fragmentation before going regular defrag). Some problems have occured, such as me shutting down while forgetting I was running defraggler and having to do some funky things to get vista running again (The ONE time System Restore would have helped... but system repair works just as well). Well, alot of system repair runs actually... It looked like there was a curropt sector but neither scan disk nor disk scan :P detected anything. I'm guessing MFT Corruption.

But, in general, defraging can only improve performance... when things like VISTA'S defrag run's they compact just like everything else... it's just worse than XP's defrag since XP actually attempts to defrag the system... vista sort of makes a half lazy effort. But REALIZE, Defraggers are typically idiot defraggers. Even if I found a REAL PRO Defragger that would let me manually do all the crazy stuff I think up... I would probally never use it. Defraggers are made for people who either don't want to do those calculations, or probally can't (raises hand). If you get decreased performance it's a bad defragger... if another defragger gives you increased performance over defraggler... it may be a better defragger. Depending on what algorithms are used performance benifits can vary...

But just realize that defragger is a misnomer. Defraggler is a Disk Optimizer, it does more than "defrag" (in the sense of file fragmentation) it optimizes disk reads... and that means that it makes "intelligent" decisions on what to do.



And just a re on the "don't use the tool" YES, defraggers are made for idiots (seriously, there is no better term... and laymen doesn't cut it... because "idiots" might, say, delete files simply because they can't be defragmented... and some of these files might be NEEDED system files. Or they may mash the buttons, repeatedly start and stop the defragger... complain about their computer being slow while running the defragger... or even try running THREE defraggers AT THE SAME TIME [it'll take a THRID of the time!] DO NOT underestimate the stupidity of the laymen... that is why the term idiot is needed... and that, expecally, is why people who don't have a basic understanding shouldn't mess with defraggers.


I have a hard enough time trying to "teach" these people that I "might" actually know a little more (I do admit I am not an expert... but sometimes... you SHOULD listen [and I will listen to you, but substatate your claims more than "you're wrong"] because I DID have a chat with this guy who was running 3 separate defrags... (or so he claimed O.o) and he was going on and on about the superior optimization, how it's faster... better... you know, I think he really was just full of it.

But there probally are people who DO think like that, thinking more is better (why settle for one SOFTWARE firewall when you can DOWNLOAD 6!) or that all software is the same (vista has a defrag, why use defraggler? You're just trying to get me to install a virus!)


So I appologise for the excessive use of Idiot, but understand I am reffering to the catagory of people that software developers most fear... and also the people that are suppose to be smarter than I. :( I remember stating how usless System Restore was and this person listed off "decent" reasons, then ended up pulling "virus" out... when I finally popped the question of "have you ever used it". I think driver conflict ARE the best reason to use System Restore... but sigh... it most certainly isn't worth the resources to leave it on. Turn it on when you need it, turn it off (and clear the cache) when you don't. (needless to say, he said "no, but if I ever need to it'll be right there". I still recommend making a drive image immediatly after installing the OS and all the drivers... if you move your programs to a separate partition you can even make it after installing all the "essentials" and still take up less space than System Restore (and without the overhead) only a "few" programs actually need to be installed again, as many programs automatically put their registry keys in if missing... and since the image is of the system only, no "files" are lost (true, a few user files and stragglers will be lost... but try to move as much as you can out of C:). [AND, it's a clean install without reinstalling all that software!] The only issue that occurs is if you have a virus... but I still doubt that system restore could help you.

*What can I say.. I'm crazy*



Oh, but one note.... the tad about "password" and leet... I totally mean that. Those people are imbeciles. The SMART PEOPLE say johnc@yahoo.com, the stupid people? Johnc AT yahoo DOT com.

WHY are they stupid?
http://www.google.co...%...mp;oq=&aqi=

Because my bot found their email address.


If you're going to give out your email, do so normally.... or do this I'm user johnc with the mail server yahoo
While I can program my bot to detect the irregular words "such as Johnc" it's also more difficult than grabbing new emails off of google.


Once upon a time, there may have been bots... but the smart people learned to instant message... the idiots came up with the idea of making their emails "locatable by search engine."

(Would you actually believe one of those "smart people" who I actually SHOWED that google trick said that "more bots search for @ than AT (it's an EASY alteration) if you REALLY want to be bot happy, do a url=email... but stop spreading these... stupidities. I can't even imagine why someone decided the admin password should be changed to password... and password in LEET none the less.... but it's idiotic, "password" is not a password, "password1" is not a password. ANYTHING with the word password in it... is NOT a password. XJ97374 is a password.... even "ms-sux" is a better password than password. And the "special characters" leet? Thats just a joke, brute force engines are NOT made by idiots... they account for all the UTC-8 (I think) characters, even the non-web standard ones.

The end result of that password is JUST that you're going to be more annoyed typing it than a hacker is going to be breaking it.

#11 OFFLINE Andavari

Andavari

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:51 AM

@Mosillivo
System Restore isn't completely useless since it has saved many people from having to format their computers from various problems since "crap just happens to Windows", and not all system damage is directly related to malware.

Since you suggest to turn off System Restore it's always a good ideal to give people another option of backing up their registry with something like the free ERUNT.

Piriform software help documentation is available at: http://www.piriform.com/docs

 

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